Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

bi·o·lu·mi·nes·cence Noun /ˌbīōˌlo͞oməˈnesəns/
1. The biochemical emission of light by living organisms.

These neurons from the hippocampus of a mouse were genetically altered with fluorescent proteins from jellyfish to create about 90 shades of color. The Harvard researchers who invented this technique call it “Brainbow”; the vivid hues help researchers observe the complex interactions between brain cells.

These neurons from the hippocampus of a mouse were genetically altered with fluorescent proteins from jellyfish to create about 90 shades of color. The Harvard researchers who invented this technique call it “Brainbow”; the vivid hues help researchers observe the complex interactions between brain cells.

A new red fluorescent protein—derived from a brilliant red sea anemone  purchased in a Moscow pet shop—can reveal body tissues more vividly than  other fluorescent proteins in use today. The Russian researchers who  developed the new protein said it can render cancers and other target  tissues easily visible in living animals, making them glow like  Christmas bulbs.
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A new red fluorescent protein—derived from a brilliant red sea anemone purchased in a Moscow pet shop—can reveal body tissues more vividly than other fluorescent proteins in use today. The Russian researchers who developed the new protein said it can render cancers and other target tissues easily visible in living animals, making them glow like Christmas bulbs.

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The green-fluorescent protein (GFP) of the hydromedusa Aequorea victoria is used widely for laboratory, clinical, and molecular applications. In the medusa itself, the protein is used to redirect energy from the photoprotein, which would normally emit blue light, to a longer wavelength green light. Although you may sometimes see photo captions that erroneously claim the entire jellyfish is glowing, this is not true. In living specimens such as this, GFP is actually located in discrete spots around the bell margin.

The green-fluorescent protein (GFP) of the hydromedusa Aequorea victoria is used widely for laboratory, clinical, and molecular applications. In the medusa itself, the protein is used to redirect energy from the photoprotein, which would normally emit blue light, to a longer wavelength green light. Although you may sometimes see photo captions that erroneously claim the entire jellyfish is glowing, this is not true. In living specimens such as this, GFP is actually located in discrete spots around the bell margin.