Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

bi·o·lu·mi·nes·cence Noun /ˌbīōˌlo͞oməˈnesəns/
1. The biochemical emission of light by living organisms.

(via pattopet)

Bioluminescent Christmas tree by edquint8364.

Bioluminescent Christmas tree by edquint8364.


This is a click beetle (Family Elateridae) that has bioluminescence in  the two yellow patches in the pronotum. It is a constant green color and  it seems prone to illuminate when it is alert. This was found near the  Cerro de San Gil Reserve in Izabal, Guatemala.

by Adrian Tween

This is a click beetle (Family Elateridae) that has bioluminescence in the two yellow patches in the pronotum. It is a constant green color and it seems prone to illuminate when it is alert. This was found near the Cerro de San Gil Reserve in Izabal, Guatemala.

by Adrian Tween

Bioluminescence of a jellyfish. From Flickr, by NOAA.

Bioluminescence of a jellyfish. From Flickr, by NOAA.

Bioluminescence on Pandora, the fictional planet in the film Avatar.

Bioluminescence on Pandora, the fictional planet in the film Avatar.

imagebanger:

Neon Leon (the squid)

imagebanger:

Neon Leon (the squid)

(via imagebanger-deactivated20120413)

villagedog:

Totem animal #27: deep-sea shrimp (parapandulus) emitting bioluminescent “vomit” as defense mechanism. Red-light image by biologist  Sönke Johnsen, 2009.

Scientists aren’t certain about the purpose of the  glowing stuff yet, but think it may work “like the exploding-paint money  bags you see in bank robbery movies,” Johnsen said. “An animal that  disturbs the shrimp gets coated with light, which makes it highly  visible to predators.”

More information on “Bioluminescence 2009” here.

villagedog:

Totem animal #27: deep-sea shrimp (parapandulus) emitting bioluminescent “vomit” as defense mechanism. Red-light image by biologist Sönke Johnsen, 2009.

Scientists aren’t certain about the purpose of the glowing stuff yet, but think it may work “like the exploding-paint money bags you see in bank robbery movies,” Johnsen said. “An animal that disturbs the shrimp gets coated with light, which makes it highly visible to predators.”

More information on “Bioluminescence 2009” here.

heirtohyrule:

Bloodybelly Comb Jellyfish

heirtohyrule:

Bloodybelly Comb Jellyfish

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benthos:

Bioluminescent fish

benthos:

Bioluminescent fish

rhamphotheca:

 
Fluorescent Dreams: Gonodactylus platysoma fluoresces
It’s fitting that we start the third image gallery with this new contribution by Dr. Caldwell, because this pic of a fluorescing G. platysoma is one of the most beautiful images of stomatopods in the website! This was collected and photographed on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. The animal was illuminated with a blue light (470 nm) and photographed through a strong yellow filter which filters out all of the blue light. Only fluorescent emissions were recorded. The red is a green algae and some coralline algae…
For more information on the phenomenon of fluorescence in stomatopods, click here.
For more informaion on this species, click here.
(via: Blue Board)

rhamphotheca:

Fluorescent Dreams: Gonodactylus platysoma fluoresces

It’s fitting that we start the third image gallery with this new contribution by Dr. Caldwell, because this pic of a fluorescing G. platysoma is one of the most beautiful images of stomatopods in the website! This was collected and photographed on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. The animal was illuminated with a blue light (470 nm) and photographed through a strong yellow filter which filters out all of the blue light. Only fluorescent emissions were recorded. The red is a green algae and some coralline algae…

For more information on the phenomenon of fluorescence in stomatopods, click here.

For more informaion on this species, click here.

(via: Blue Board)