Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

bi·o·lu·mi·nes·cence Noun /ˌbīōˌlo͞oməˈnesəns/
1. The biochemical emission of light by living organisms.


It’s a South American cockroach, Lucihormetica luckae, that Discover Magazine reports was recently studied by scientists for its ability to glow in an effort to explain how bioluminescence began on land (it is more common in marine mammals).

It’s a South American cockroach, Lucihormetica luckae, that Discover Magazine reports was recently studied by scientists for its ability to glow in an effort to explain how bioluminescence began on land (it is more common in marine mammals).

hiyoko-hime:

A glowing termite mound found in Brazil.

The glowing comes from chemicals released in the head of the Headlight beetle larvae. They use the glow as a way of attracting prey.

A deadly yet beautiful light show. :)

tmyrc-t:

Beautiful BioluminescenceCredit: ©AMNH\D. Finnin

The ability to produce light via a chemical reaction has evolved over and over again in fireflies, other insects, bacteria, jellyfish, bony fish, fungi, and single-celled dinoflagellates shown above. Dinoflagellates flash when disturbed, and in high concentrations they produce the toxic red tides.

(via: Bioluminescent: A Glow in the Dark Gallery)

tmyrc-t:

Beautiful Bioluminescence
Credit: ©AMNH\D. Finnin

The ability to produce light via a chemical reaction has evolved over and over again in fireflies, other insects, bacteria, jellyfish, bony fish, fungi, and single-celled dinoflagellates shown above. Dinoflagellates flash when disturbed, and in high concentrations they produce the toxic red tides.

(via: Bioluminescent: A Glow in the Dark Gallery)

Bioluminescence in the movie Avatar.

Bioluminescence in the movie Avatar.

sugaratoms:


Bloody Bay wall in the Cayman IslandsCredit: Jim Hellemn, portraitofacoralreef.com
Wall of Color

Pictured is the Cayman Islands’ Bloody Bay Wall, a species-rich, 1,000-foot-tall wall of coral that is home to many bioluminescent and biofluorescent animals. To take this amazing photograph, photographers in scuba gear flooded the reef in violet light and captured the corals’ conversion of the light into red and green.

sugaratoms:

Bloody Bay wall in the Cayman Islands
Credit: Jim Hellemn, portraitofacoralreef.com

Wall of Color

Pictured is the Cayman Islands’ Bloody Bay Wall, a species-rich, 1,000-foot-tall wall of coral that is home to many bioluminescent and biofluorescent animals. To take this amazing photograph, photographers in scuba gear flooded the reef in violet light and captured the corals’ conversion of the light into red and green.
Bioluminescent Christmas tree by edquint8364.

Bioluminescent Christmas tree by edquint8364.


This is a click beetle (Family Elateridae) that has bioluminescence in  the two yellow patches in the pronotum. It is a constant green color and  it seems prone to illuminate when it is alert. This was found near the  Cerro de San Gil Reserve in Izabal, Guatemala.

by Adrian Tween

This is a click beetle (Family Elateridae) that has bioluminescence in the two yellow patches in the pronotum. It is a constant green color and it seems prone to illuminate when it is alert. This was found near the Cerro de San Gil Reserve in Izabal, Guatemala.

by Adrian Tween

Bioluminescence of a jellyfish. From Flickr, by NOAA.

Bioluminescence of a jellyfish. From Flickr, by NOAA.

microbatdynamo:

Humans glow in the dark | Science
Amazing pictures of “glittering” human bodies have been released by Japanese scientists who have captured the first ever images of human “bioluminescence”.
Although it has been known for many years that all living creatures produce a small amount of light as a result of chemical reactions within their cells, this is the first time light produced by humans has been captured on camera.
Writing in the online journal PLoS ONE, the researchers describe how they imaged volunteers’ upper bodies using ultra-sensitive cameras over a period of several days. Their results show that the amount of light emitted follows a 24-hour cycle, at its highest in late afternoon and lowest late at night, and that the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, forehead and neck.
Strangely, the areas that produced the brightest light did not correspond with the brightest areas on thermal images of the volunteers’ bodies.

(via guardian.co.uk)

microbatdynamo:

Humans glow in the dark | Science

Amazing pictures of “glittering” human bodies have been released by Japanese scientists who have captured the first ever images of human “bioluminescence”.

Although it has been known for many years that all living creatures produce a small amount of light as a result of chemical reactions within their cells, this is the first time light produced by humans has been captured on camera.

Writing in the online journal PLoS ONE, the researchers describe how they imaged volunteers’ upper bodies using ultra-sensitive cameras over a period of several days. Their results show that the amount of light emitted follows a 24-hour cycle, at its highest in late afternoon and lowest late at night, and that the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, forehead and neck.

Strangely, the areas that produced the brightest light did not correspond with the brightest areas on thermal images of the volunteers’ bodies.

(via guardian.co.uk)

Bioluminescence on Pandora, the fictional planet in the film Avatar.

Bioluminescence on Pandora, the fictional planet in the film Avatar.