Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

bi·o·lu·mi·nes·cence Noun /ˌbīōˌlo͞oməˈnesəns/
1. The biochemical emission of light by living organisms.

tmyrc-t:

Beautiful BioluminescenceCredit: ©AMNH\D. Finnin

The ability to produce light via a chemical reaction has evolved over and over again in fireflies, other insects, bacteria, jellyfish, bony fish, fungi, and single-celled dinoflagellates shown above. Dinoflagellates flash when disturbed, and in high concentrations they produce the toxic red tides.

(via: Bioluminescent: A Glow in the Dark Gallery)

tmyrc-t:

Beautiful Bioluminescence
Credit: ©AMNH\D. Finnin

The ability to produce light via a chemical reaction has evolved over and over again in fireflies, other insects, bacteria, jellyfish, bony fish, fungi, and single-celled dinoflagellates shown above. Dinoflagellates flash when disturbed, and in high concentrations they produce the toxic red tides.

(via: Bioluminescent: A Glow in the Dark Gallery)

(via pattopet)


This is a click beetle (Family Elateridae) that has bioluminescence in  the two yellow patches in the pronotum. It is a constant green color and  it seems prone to illuminate when it is alert. This was found near the  Cerro de San Gil Reserve in Izabal, Guatemala.

by Adrian Tween

This is a click beetle (Family Elateridae) that has bioluminescence in the two yellow patches in the pronotum. It is a constant green color and it seems prone to illuminate when it is alert. This was found near the Cerro de San Gil Reserve in Izabal, Guatemala.

by Adrian Tween

microbatdynamo:

Humans glow in the dark | Science
Amazing pictures of “glittering” human bodies have been released by Japanese scientists who have captured the first ever images of human “bioluminescence”.
Although it has been known for many years that all living creatures produce a small amount of light as a result of chemical reactions within their cells, this is the first time light produced by humans has been captured on camera.
Writing in the online journal PLoS ONE, the researchers describe how they imaged volunteers’ upper bodies using ultra-sensitive cameras over a period of several days. Their results show that the amount of light emitted follows a 24-hour cycle, at its highest in late afternoon and lowest late at night, and that the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, forehead and neck.
Strangely, the areas that produced the brightest light did not correspond with the brightest areas on thermal images of the volunteers’ bodies.

(via guardian.co.uk)

microbatdynamo:

Humans glow in the dark | Science

Amazing pictures of “glittering” human bodies have been released by Japanese scientists who have captured the first ever images of human “bioluminescence”.

Although it has been known for many years that all living creatures produce a small amount of light as a result of chemical reactions within their cells, this is the first time light produced by humans has been captured on camera.

Writing in the online journal PLoS ONE, the researchers describe how they imaged volunteers’ upper bodies using ultra-sensitive cameras over a period of several days. Their results show that the amount of light emitted follows a 24-hour cycle, at its highest in late afternoon and lowest late at night, and that the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, forehead and neck.

Strangely, the areas that produced the brightest light did not correspond with the brightest areas on thermal images of the volunteers’ bodies.

(via guardian.co.uk)

sciencenote:

Drosophila neural stem cells in the central nervous system are  labelled in green (membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, GFP).  Their large nucleoli (involved in cell growth) are shown in blue  (stained for Fibrillarin). The nuclei of the surrounding neurons are  labelled in red (stained for Elav).

sciencenote:

Drosophila neural stem cells in the central nervous system are labelled in green (membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, GFP). Their large nucleoli (involved in cell growth) are shown in blue (stained for Fibrillarin). The nuclei of the surrounding neurons are labelled in red (stained for Elav).

Bioluminescence on Pandora, the fictional planet in the film Avatar.

Bioluminescence on Pandora, the fictional planet in the film Avatar.

deadman325:

The Hawaiian Bobtail Squid uses bioluminescence in a unique way to avoid predators.
The squid harbours a population of Vivio Fischeri -a luminescent bacteria- in glands underneath its body. These bacteria, like many others, are able to communicate with one another through Quorum Sensing. Quorum Sensing involves the secretion of molecules called autoinducers into the extracellular environment. The bacteria then use specialised receptors to detect the concentration of autoinducers in their surroundings, which allows them to estimate the local population density of their own species or other bacteria-because other individuals in the area have also been secreting autoinducers.
What Quorom Sensing allows bacteria to do is to regulate gene activity on a community level. Once a certain population is reached, all the individuals in the colony know about it, and this information (the concentration of autoinducer) triggers the transcription of genes that were previously inactive. Viruses for example, only begin attacking the body when they know that there are enough of them around to actually have an effect on the host. Similarly, bioluminescence is only turned on when there is a threshold amount of bacteria in the glands of the squid.
Incredibly, the squid has managed to sync the bacterial bio-luminescence with its Circadian rhythm, expelling just the right amount of bacteria during the day (it would actually be harmful to keep them in for long periods), so that by night time, they’ve multiplied to exactly the right number to activate bio-luminescence via quorum sensing. Depending on the level of moonlight or starlight, the squid is then able to use this bio-luminescence to create the illusion that it does not create a shadow- allowing it to avoid predators.
And we thought humans were innovative.

deadman325:

The Hawaiian Bobtail Squid uses bioluminescence in a unique way to avoid predators.

The squid harbours a population of Vivio Fischeri -a luminescent bacteria- in glands underneath its body. These bacteria, like many others, are able to communicate with one another through Quorum Sensing. Quorum Sensing involves the secretion of molecules called autoinducers into the extracellular environment. The bacteria then use specialised receptors to detect the concentration of autoinducers in their surroundings, which allows them to estimate the local population density of their own species or other bacteria-because other individuals in the area have also been secreting autoinducers.

What Quorom Sensing allows bacteria to do is to regulate gene activity on a community level. Once a certain population is reached, all the individuals in the colony know about it, and this information (the concentration of autoinducer) triggers the transcription of genes that were previously inactive. Viruses for example, only begin attacking the body when they know that there are enough of them around to actually have an effect on the host. Similarly, bioluminescence is only turned on when there is a threshold amount of bacteria in the glands of the squid.

Incredibly, the squid has managed to sync the bacterial bio-luminescence with its Circadian rhythm, expelling just the right amount of bacteria during the day (it would actually be harmful to keep them in for long periods), so that by night time, they’ve multiplied to exactly the right number to activate bio-luminescence via quorum sensing. Depending on the level of moonlight or starlight, the squid is then able to use this bio-luminescence to create the illusion that it does not create a shadow- allowing it to avoid predators.

And we thought humans were innovative.

(via deadman325-deactivated20111020)

villagedog:

Totem animal #27: deep-sea shrimp (parapandulus) emitting bioluminescent “vomit” as defense mechanism. Red-light image by biologist  Sönke Johnsen, 2009.

Scientists aren’t certain about the purpose of the  glowing stuff yet, but think it may work “like the exploding-paint money  bags you see in bank robbery movies,” Johnsen said. “An animal that  disturbs the shrimp gets coated with light, which makes it highly  visible to predators.”

More information on “Bioluminescence 2009” here.

villagedog:

Totem animal #27: deep-sea shrimp (parapandulus) emitting bioluminescent “vomit” as defense mechanism. Red-light image by biologist Sönke Johnsen, 2009.

Scientists aren’t certain about the purpose of the glowing stuff yet, but think it may work “like the exploding-paint money bags you see in bank robbery movies,” Johnsen said. “An animal that disturbs the shrimp gets coated with light, which makes it highly visible to predators.”

More information on “Bioluminescence 2009” here.

heirtohyrule:

Bloodybelly Comb Jellyfish

heirtohyrule:

Bloodybelly Comb Jellyfish

(via teamrocketexecutivetyler-deacti)

brightensyourday:

Brainbow of the hippocampus in a transgenic mouse.
(Read about Brainbow here and here)

brightensyourday:

Brainbow of the hippocampus in a transgenic mouse.

(Read about Brainbow here and here)

benthos:

Bioluminescent fish

benthos:

Bioluminescent fish