Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

Bright & Beautiful Bioluminescence

bi·o·lu·mi·nes·cence Noun /ˌbīōˌlo͞oməˈnesəns/
1. The biochemical emission of light by living organisms.


It’s a South American cockroach, Lucihormetica luckae, that Discover Magazine reports was recently studied by scientists for its ability to glow in an effort to explain how bioluminescence began on land (it is more common in marine mammals).

It’s a South American cockroach, Lucihormetica luckae, that Discover Magazine reports was recently studied by scientists for its ability to glow in an effort to explain how bioluminescence began on land (it is more common in marine mammals).

I'm so happy I found your blog! It looks gorgeous!
rubbermaddox

Thank you!

hiyoko-hime:

A glowing termite mound found in Brazil.

The glowing comes from chemicals released in the head of the Headlight beetle larvae. They use the glow as a way of attracting prey.

A deadly yet beautiful light show. :)

tmyrc-t:

Beautiful BioluminescenceCredit: ©AMNH\D. Finnin

The ability to produce light via a chemical reaction has evolved over and over again in fireflies, other insects, bacteria, jellyfish, bony fish, fungi, and single-celled dinoflagellates shown above. Dinoflagellates flash when disturbed, and in high concentrations they produce the toxic red tides.

(via: Bioluminescent: A Glow in the Dark Gallery)

tmyrc-t:

Beautiful Bioluminescence
Credit: ©AMNH\D. Finnin

The ability to produce light via a chemical reaction has evolved over and over again in fireflies, other insects, bacteria, jellyfish, bony fish, fungi, and single-celled dinoflagellates shown above. Dinoflagellates flash when disturbed, and in high concentrations they produce the toxic red tides.

(via: Bioluminescent: A Glow in the Dark Gallery)

Bioluminescence in the movie Avatar.

Bioluminescence in the movie Avatar.

Is there a certain time of the year, that Bioluminescence can be found in the water of Galveston, Texas
Anonymous

If I had to guess, I would say that spring would be the best time to see any bioluminescent algae in the Gulf of Mexico. I’m not familiar with the area, but spring turnover releases nutrients that are usually unavailable to surface waters and allows a bloom of growth for phytoplankton around April/May.

how do the animals become bioluminecent? do they let a gas out?
Anonymous

Most animals bioluminesce through the use of proteins. A chemical reaction between luciferin and and luciferase releases energy in the form of light. Many animals that have bioluminescent spots achieve this by “enslaving” bacteria that naturally glow. Other animals, like fireflies, do this chemical reaction on their own.

Echo Ecology

Check out my new blog! If you love ALL wildlife and animals (not just the glowing kind) you’ll be sure to enjoy this eco-centric tumblr.

sugaratoms:


Bloody Bay wall in the Cayman IslandsCredit: Jim Hellemn, portraitofacoralreef.com
Wall of Color

Pictured is the Cayman Islands’ Bloody Bay Wall, a species-rich, 1,000-foot-tall wall of coral that is home to many bioluminescent and biofluorescent animals. To take this amazing photograph, photographers in scuba gear flooded the reef in violet light and captured the corals’ conversion of the light into red and green.

sugaratoms:

Bloody Bay wall in the Cayman Islands
Credit: Jim Hellemn, portraitofacoralreef.com

Wall of Color

Pictured is the Cayman Islands’ Bloody Bay Wall, a species-rich, 1,000-foot-tall wall of coral that is home to many bioluminescent and biofluorescent animals. To take this amazing photograph, photographers in scuba gear flooded the reef in violet light and captured the corals’ conversion of the light into red and green.